Teaching Twitter to Teachers

Tomorrow – wait, later today I’ll be sharing Twitter with some amazing colleagues. And where to begin? With a blog post of course! I actually started to write out notes to myself on paper and then thought “what am I doing?” I always lose those notes and almost never follow up on my “to do’s” written  on them.

Anyway… twitter, like most things in life is something for which the more you put in to it, the more you’ll get out of it.

So what is twitter? This is twitter… from James Gates:

Twitter lets you build connections to other people who share similar interests or passions – or not, you can follow whomever you like.

I mainly follow educators, and from them I have learned so much! I met Kima (at an Edcamp I learned about on Twitter) and became involved with http://www.tedxkidsbc.com. I learn so much from Twitter every single day. Twitter gets me thinking about my educational philosophy. It makes me see things in new lights and gives me access to really, REALLY smart, switched on, engaged teachers who love their jobs. Twitter gets me fired up! It connects me to new people, new ideas, new ways of doing things – like Genius Hour!

This past Saturday I was at home, sick and exhausted. From my sofa, I got on Twitter and discovered that there was a Connected Educators Conference happening in Calgary that day. I was glued to my computer screen. Reading tweets, clicking on links from presenters so I could follow along, replying to tweets, connecting to other passionate teachers, reading blogs, sharing ideas. It was the best professional development I’ve been to this year – and I was in my condo, in my PJs… and it was free! Free is good, people. Oh, Edcamps – those are usually free too. Well, unless you get the $5 bagged lunch – get the lunch.

Here is the result of my day of learning in my den at home:

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And here’s a twitter convo with a new follower resulting from my tweet:

Screen Shot 2013-05-30 at 12.33.23 AM

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